Costs

Monetary Cost

This project is part of a resurfacing project.  To maintain the street, the City periodically removes and replaces the top layer of asphalt.  Afterwards, striping must be reapplied.  Because this redesign would follow resurfacing, it is no more expensive than retaining the current lane configuration, i.e. there is no significant monetary cost.

Parking Capacity Cost

The main cost of this project is the loss of parallel street parking on the north side of the street.  This may require residents to cross the street to access their vehicle or house.  However a corridor parking study assessing parking use on each block with ~70 day and night, weekday and weekend observations shows that bike lanes will not reduce parking capacity below use for any altered block (Figs. 6 and 7).  See also raw data for Kavanaugh daytime and nighttime parking.

Parking capacity (green and yellow) on Kavanaugh between Markham and Walnut with buffered bike lanes as currently proposed.
Figure 6.  Parking capacity (green and yellow) on Kavanaugh between Markham and Walnut with buffered bike lanes as currently proposed.

Parking capacity (green and yellow) on Kavanaugh between Markham and Walnut with buffered bike lanes as currently proposed.
Figure 7.  Parking capacity (green and yellow) on Kavanaugh between Markham and Walnut with buffered bike lanes as currently proposed.

Other Costs

Residents on the north side of Kavanaugh who parallel park on Kavanaugh will have to cross the street in order to access their car.  Protected bike lanes would change Kavanaugh's aesthetic.